The London Institute is committed to a new way to fund and organize research, and the press is taking note. As well as the Institute as a whole, the media has publicized many of our research papers, making our scientific insights available to a broader audience.

  • Nature

    Nature

    Boost for British science

    In Nature, the London Institute argues that its five new Research Fellowships for Russian theorists will be a boost for British science.

  • The Telegraph

    The Telegraph

    Price of immortality

    Like Orpheus in the Underworld, the London Institute is challenging mortality, says our writer Thomas Hodgkinson in The Sunday Telegraph.

  • New Scientist

    Research

    AI helps with maths

    An AI that can turn mathematics problems written in English into a formal proving language could make them easier for other AIs to solve.

  • The Washington Post

    Research

    Death, be not proud

    The Washington Post explains how man's mad search for immortality is getting serious in our cell programming collaboration with bit.bio.

  • the times

    Research

    Challenging Times

    Is free will a mathematical problem? How about immortality? Or the quest for AI? The Times reports on our 23 Mathematical Challenges.

  • THE SPECTATOR

    Interview

    A singular mind

    In an interview with Thomas Fink, Sir Roger Penrose talks about his Nobel Prize, the beauty of physics—and why AI is nothing to fear.

  • FORBES

    Research

    LIMS-bit.bio

    Forbes explains how the London Institute, working with the biologists at bit.bio, may revolutionise our understanding of human life.

  • the times

    Research

    LIMS-bit.bio

    The Times welcomes the collaboration between London Institute mathematicians and the biologists at bit.bio to crack cell reprogramming.

  • Verdict

    Research

    Maths, meet biology

    Verdict reports on the collaboration between the London Institute and cell coding company bit.bio to decode the operating system of life.

  • Harvard Business Review

    Papers

    Taming complexity

    Complexity may be hard to unpick, without being inherently bad. Ensure the benefits of any addition to company systems outweigh its costs.

  • Science|Business

    Opinions

    Taking back research

    In today’s Science|Business, the London Institute welcomes the prospect of a UK DARPA and calls for shorter turn-around times for funding.

  • High Life

    Research

    Sage of discovery

    British Airways’ inflight magazine runs a three-page profile of the London Institute, its founder and its new approach to doing science.

  • APS Physics

    Papers

    Slurry in a hurry

    The 3D structures of slurries—fluids full of solid particles—can be swiftly measured using a single 2D shot and electron diffraction data.

  • The Washington Post

    Papers

    Whatever you say

    If you meet a conspiracy theorist, don't bother trying to change their views. Encountering the truth only makes them more pig-headed.

  • Nature Physics

    Papers

    Yes you cayenne

    In innovation, the most apparently niche ingredients may turn out to be the most useful, as the structures of recipes become more complex.

  • Bloomberg Opinion

    Papers

    Moore means less

    Following Moore's law, solar power will become ever cheaper as an energy source—and there’s nothing Donald Trump can do about it.

  • Phys.org

    Papers

    Fools rush in

    Measures meant to stabilise economies may have the opposite effect, creating cyclical structures in the networks of contracts between banks.

  • Bloomberg

    Papers

    A little bird told me

    Twitter sentiment during busy periods, such as ahead of quarterly earnings releases, provides some indication if a stock will rise or fall.

  • Nature

    Papers

    Too many banks

    Increasing the interconnectedness of the banking system was supposed to increase economic stability, but may be having the opposite effect.

  • Scientific American

    Papers

    Harnessing Serendipity

    Quirky and apparently mysterious, innovation is critical to sustained economic growth—and mathematics can help us understand how it works.

  • INC.

    Papers

    The future’s bright

    Architects are designing rotating homes to increase the efficiency of solar power, while its cost is set to keep falling by 10% annually.

  • The Guardian

    Papers

    Here comes the sun

    The cost of solar power will continue to fall by 10% annually, meeting 20% of global energy needs far sooner than has been predicted.

  • Science News

    Papers

    A stock response

    The simultaneous study of news sentiment and browsing behaviour, even on small time-scales, can help to predict stock market fluctuations.

  • Nature World News

    Papers

    Beauty in repairability

    The hunt for networks that best combine efficiency with repairability, to avoid breakdown, leads to structural designs that resemble snowflakes.

  • New Scientist

    Papers

    Snowflakes don't break

    Snowflake-shaped networks, with redundant arms that come into use when main branches break down, are easiest to fix when disaster strikes.