Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres
Blackboard - Ever-shrinking spheres

Ever-shrinking spheres

Techniques from random sphere packing predict the dimension of the Apollonian gasket, a fractal made up of non-overlapping hyperspheres.

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  • The OS of life

    Events

    The OS of life

    Breakthroughs in cell programming are kicking off a biological analogue of the silicon revolution, allowing us to predictably engineer life.

  • Accelerating innovation

    upcoming event

    Accelerating innovation

    The London Institute and the Ditchley Foundation host an afternoon discussion and drinks on the science of innovation and how to speed it up.

  • From Russia with math

    perspectives

    From Russia with math

    History suggests our new posts for physicists and mathematicians from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus will have an enduring impact on UK science.

  • Arnold Fellowships

    News

    Arnold Fellowships

    In support of those affected by the war in Ukraine, we have created five new Fellowships for scientists from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus.

  • Papers

    Learning Hilbert series

    Neural networks find efficient ways to compute the Hilbert series, an important counting function in algebraic geometry and gauge theory.

  • Papers

    The rules of life

    The bipartite nature of regulatory networks means gene-gene logics are composed, which severely restricts which ones can show up in life.

  • perspectives

    Designing web design

    To mark our Webby nomination, we describe the design principles behind our website and how they evolved in tandem with the Institute itself.

  • News

    Webby Award Nominee

    Our website has been nominated for the best science website in the Webby Awards—hailed the “internet’s highest honor” by The New York Times.

  • News

    Cell programming portal

    The London Institute is creating a portal that connects bit.bio and theorists to accelerate research on the mathematics of cell programming.

  • News

    The power of presence

    One reason that we outperform other research centres is that everyone turns up for work, which makes us more creative, agile and aligned.

  • Papers

    Line bundle connections

    Neural networks find numerical solutions to Hermitian Yang-Mills equations, a difficult system of PDEs crucial to mathematics and physics.

  • Events

    Quantifying AI

    Peter Cochrane talks about how quantifying machine intelligence, distinct from biological intelligence, can quell the debate on AI’s future.

  • Papers

    Calabi-Yau anomalies

    Unsupervised machine-learning of the Hodge numbers of Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces detects new patterns with an unexpected linear dependence.

  • Events

    Cell programming maths

    The London Institute and bit.bio host a two-day international meeting to unravel the theory of cell programming at the Royal Institution.

  • News

    Benchmarking research

    To better benchmark research at the London Institute, we weight our published papers by the fraction of authors that are at the Institute.

  • Events

    LonTI lecture series

    During spring, the London Institute hosts weekly lectures in theoretical physics for young researchers who are interested in new fields.

  • Events

    Theory of Everything

    Professor Yang-Hui He tells the captivating story of the holy grail of science: the mathematical quest for a unifying theory of everything.

  • Papers

    Beyond classical barriers

    Circuits of memristors, resistors with memory, can exhibit instabilities which allow classical tunnelling through potential energy barriers.

  • News

    Stone on stone

    In our updated landing page, we let our blackboards do the talking: each blackboard illustrates a key concept from one of our best papers.

  • website

    A year to remember

    In 2021, we hired new talent, wrote pioneering papers and moved into Faraday's rooms at the Royal Institution. Here we celebrate the highs.

  • press

    What the Dickens?

    Our writer Thomas W. Hodgkinson argues that Charles Dickens named his novel David Copperfield in honour of the Royal Institution.

  • WEBSITE

    Unifying mathematics

    Our new fifth research theme contains projects that explore how different branches of mathematics are intertwined, and how to unify them.

  • News

    12 Days of Christmas

    The Institute’s Christmas card includes one side to the Möbius strip, five exceptional Lie groups and eight basis vectors of the octonians.

  • Events

    Talking to Penrose

    Sir Roger Penrose talks about physics, philosophy and art in a conversation with Thomas Fink and Yang-Hui He in the Faraday lecture theatre.