Synopsis: Grain Properties in a Single Shot
Reconstructing grain-shape statistics from electron back-scatter diffraction microscopy
APS Physics, 31 Jul 2018
Building a machine that breaks the laws of thermodynamics
Organic molecule fluorescence as an experimental test-bed for quantum jumps in thermodynamics
SOTT, 4 Apr 2018
Serendipity and strategy in rapid innovation
Money Science, 13 Jan 2018
Serendipity and strategy in rapid innovation
Serendipity and strategy in rapid innovation
Money Science, 13 Jan 2018
Economic complexity: From useless to keystone
Serendipity and strategy in rapid innovation
Nature Physics, 5 Jan 2018
„Fake News“ an User-Interaktionen erkennen
Debunking in a world of tribes
Science ORF, 7 Dec 2017
A Better Way to Make Economic Forecasts
A new metric for countries’ fitness and products’ complexity
Bloomberg View, 1 Oct 2017
A Better Way to Make Economic Forecasts
Bloomberg View, 1 Oct 2017
SPOKEsman Paolo Barucca
SPOKEsman Paolo Barucca
Spoke London, 24 Sep 2017
La tribù fa notizia
Debunking in a world of tribes
Nòva, 24 Sep 2017
Curiosity is key in post-truth era
Debunking in a world of tribes
Winnipeg Free Press, 21 Sep 2017
Vérification des faits: cibler les groupes moins polarisés
Debunking in a world of tribes
Pieuvre, 20 Sep 2017
Ignorance feeds curiosity. Curiosity cures ignorance.
Debunking in a world of tribes
Gulf News, 19 Sep 2017
66 press stories
HOW TO BEAT THE FOREX MARKET? JUST GET ON TWITTER, ACADEMICS SAY
BullFax, 10 Apr 2017
By Liam Vaughan Traders need look no further than their Twitter feeds to gain an edge in currency markets, according to a new study by a pair of academics. Buying and selling the euro based on predictions tweeted by currency watchers would give you risk-adjusted returns almost four times bigger than standard carry-trade strategies, Vahid Gholampour and Eric van Wincoop found in a paper published last month. The odds of beating the market are best if you track Twitter users who have at least 500 followers, dubbed “informed agents” in the research because many of them work as brokers, analysts and financial commentators. The findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting market-moving information is circulated on social media before it’s fully reflected in asset prices.
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